Posts tagged feminism
The Mini-Skirt and Me

It took me a few years and a lot of work to get to a point where I was comfortable dressing in more feminine and more “revealing” clothing. For me, owning my body and owning my choices meant learning how to mimic and play at those gender expressions disregarded as “typically feminine.” I had to teach myself how to do make up, to do my hair, to be comfortable in dresses and “fancy” clothing. Modesty culture, in its attempts to protect my womanhood, had robbed me of my understanding of myself as a feminine being.

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Back to Basics: What is Privilege?

Intersectionality is, at its heart, a project of community. It both respects the individual because their story matters and prizes the individual’s place within community because the diversity of stories and experiences lead to greater understanding. Intersectional representation across differences in oppression and privilege is important because all experiences are necessary to understanding the scope of the problems before us. A black woman is going to bring a different perspective to a campaign than a white man, simply by virtue of life experience. A trans* or non-binary person is going to nuance a human rights campaign in ways that a panel of solely cisgender people will not.

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#BacktoBasics: What is Intersectionality?

This is intersectionality. It is, simply, the recognition that oppression is a web of systems, that each person experiences oppression differently based on who they are as people and their social and geographical locations. A North Korean woman living in Japan experiences oppression differently than the same woman living in Los Angeles. Intersectionality, then, is the acknowledgement that everyone’s life experiences are different, and that we must listen to those closest to the oppressions to understand how they affect people.

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Why Church Schisms are Not Easy Matters: Tony Jones, Ideological Purity, and Sin

And there’s the rub, when we’re dealing with human beings and communities and relationships. Breaking fellowship is a serious, serious thing, and not something to suggest lightly or proudly or bombastically, as Jones did. Instead, it is something that carries a weight, a heaviness. “Schism” is not a thing we simply declare and tell others to follow suit.

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