Posts tagged liberation theology
If Your Church is Not of the Marginalized, You Are Not of the Church

But the church in America is distinctly separated from that Gospel truth, as demonstrated by Strachan’s fearmongering about “becoming” marginalized. In truth, if your church and your practice is not already marginalized, if you fear marginalization, if you just now fear the persecution of “those who disagree with you,” then, bluntly: you have not been doing God’s work. I don’t know what work you’ve been doing, but work that places you in a position of privilege, work that makes you comfortable and powerful in society is the opposite of the work to which Christ calls us. Work that relies on Christianity being a dominant religion and legislating to make others follows a specific, narrow form of it is, plainly, not of God and not of Christ.

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Selma's "GLORY" is an Anthem for the Modern Church

White people in the church are terrified of centering blackness, because it challenges their notions of what the Kingdom of Glory looks like. The Kingdom is not some fluffy cloud-like land where we all play harps and walk around in white robes. The Kingdom is a reign of radical justice, where the black man may speak without fear of retribution from his white sister, where black women may walk down the street without fear of harassment from her white brother, where trans women of color can co-exist with their cis brethren without fear of attack.

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Queering Theology: Atonement and Liberation

When it comes to queer theology, not a lot of people have a good starting point when it comes to explaining important theologies like atonement. Especially in American evangelicalism, orthodoxy is impressed upon us as having one meaning and one interpretation. The “plain reading” of scripture becomes the mask for extremely complex and historical theologies that have been developed over centuries. We’re at the top of a mountain of knowledge, and we’ve convinced ourselves that our 21st century “plain readings” somehow magically create orthodoxy.

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Latin America, Liberation, and Embracing the Revolution

Liberation theology, as a whole, is deeply grounded in the economic and sociopolitical realities of the oppressed. It is determined not simply to liberate people on a spiritual level but to work for justice in their lived experience, adapting and working to make the Gospel relevant to the social position of a person’s life. Liberation theology recognizes that the Gospel has been used as a tool of the conquerors and works to make Christ’s sacrifice a tool of the rebellion. Liberation theology challenges us to confront oppressors, to fight for the downtrodden.

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